Ulfuls: Ashita ga Aru Sa

01.02.28
Artist: Ulfuls
Title: Ashita ga Aru Sa (There's Always Tomorrow)
Words: Aoshima Yukio
Music: Nakamura Hachidai
Changed song: Fukusato Shinichi

There's always tomorrow, tomorrow's a new day
In my youth I have dreams.
Someday surely, someday surely
You'll come to understand this.
There's always tomorrow, there's always tomorrow, tomorrow is a new day.

There's a guy from work who went off to form his own company
And I'm left behind at my job.
I convince myself, that there's no need to rush,
there's still plenty of time.
there's always tomorrow, there's always tomorrow, tomorrow is a new day.

My new superior is French.
Not even body language gets through to him
this is my big chance, this is my big chance
It could be good studying.
there's always tomorrow, there's always tomorrow, tomorrow is a new day.

One day I suddenly thought
What am I killing myself for ?
For my family ? For myself ?
The answer is in the wind.
there's always tomorrow, there's always tomorrow, tomorrow is a new day.

"Kids these days" often say it but,
things are much better than when I was young
Let's overlook, let's overlook
the fact that they can't even speak properly.
there's always tomorrow, there's always tomorrow, tomorrow is a new day.

There's always tomorrow, tomorrow's a new day
In my youth I have dreams.
Someday surely, someday surely
You'll come to understand this.
there's always tomorrow, there's always tomorrow, tomorrow is a new day.

Translated By: Brian Stewart & Takako Sakuma

Translator's Notes: First of all, the issue of how to translate such a simple phrase as "ashita ga aru sa asu ga aru" in its various forms became a matter of interpretation. The singer isn't simple saying there is tomorrow... but "tomorrow is a new day, we can always look forward to trying something tomorrow." I think our translation works well for this meaning. This song was orginally performed by Sakamoto Kyuu, when Takko was in grade school. The lyrics were slightly different, though the chorus was the same. The line "Aseru koto nai sa" also carries two meanings which we wrote both of, since the line is repeated. It wouldn't have sounded good repeated as is,so we added the "there's still plenty of time". The young kids not being able to speak properly, is our trying to deal with the word keigo. As many of you know Japanese has many levels of politeness and respect. In this case its the honorific form used at work, "keigo". There is also sonkeigo... and a few others... :P Well no need to learn them now, ashita ga aru sa.

Romaji

To Be Added

Romaji By: Brian Stewart