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  1. You make some valid points and obviously Mendes is perfectly in his right to refuse to helm the film.

    What you failed to identify is his choice of words which reflect upon his attitude towards the industry and the franchise.

    If a footballer was presented with the opportunity of a lifetime and stated that to play for that club for another three years made him ‘physically ill’, would you expect fellow players, the media and the public to side with him?

    Should Mendes have stated in a diplomatic fashion that he had no interest in another Bond film, then the article I wrote would not exist.

    • I will grant that he could have chosen his words better, more diplomatically. Although I must point out again that he did choose his words better the first time he made his intentions to step away clear when he spoke to Empire. If that’s not enough for you he’s done other interviews with The Guardian in which he said “physically ill” before this one and it put his comments more in the context I believe was intended. This quote is from back in December of 2012 and I see few people called him to task for it at the time.

      “It’s not true that I’ve worked out a new plot for Bond. Nor have I made any commitment to another Bond movie. I have said that I’ve put everything I wanted into this film. The idea I can simply start again makes me feel physically ill. I need to get back to theatre, spend more time at home and then… and then it might be someone else’s turn.”

      It see it as simply a matter of timing. The studio wants to keep the Bond money coming in and they want the next one now. Sam needs a little recharge time, to also honor his theater commitments, after “putting everything” into his film.

      I ask you this, what are Sam Mendes’ roots? You say he’s betrayed them but actually his roots are in the theater and he’s continued to direct plays through out his movie career. In the same article that gave us the fiery soundbite that started this whole discussion, Sam brings up the theater actually.

      “The movie world does not acknowledge the theatre world as a serious entity on the whole,” he laughs. ‘so you get a lot of, ‘Why would you do another play?'”

      Marginalize the theater? Never.

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